International Lingo

catdog

In America we say, “it’s raining cats and dogs,” when it’s raining hard outside.  I have often found it a funny saying, but I like that it’s so unique.  With Spring showers on their way, I thought I’d share what I learned this morning!

Have you ever wondered where the phrase came from?  Well, there are lots of answers, but this one from here caught my eye:

Odin, the Norse god of storms, was often pictured with dogs and wolves, which were symbols of wind. Witches, who supposedly rode their brooms during storms, were often pictured with black cats, which became signs of heavy rain for sailors.  Therefore, “raining cats and dogs” may refer to a storm with wind (dogs) and heavy rain (cats).

I saw an article in Reader’s Digest edition April 2014 this morning which made me giggle as well for Americans are not the only ones with funny heavy rain phrases!

In Denmark, “det regner skomagerdrenge” translates to: 

“It’s raining shoemakers’ apprentices.”

In Norway, “det regner trollkjerringer” translates to: 

“It’s raining she-trolls.”

In Bosnia, “padaju cuskije” translates to

“It’s raining crowbars.”

In Wales, “mae hi’n bwrw hen wragedd a ffyn” translates to

“It’s raining old ladies and sticks.”

What do they say in your country?  Please share!

Shine On!

xo

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28 thoughts on “International Lingo

  1. Hihi, I am from Norway! 🙂 Where I am from in Norway we say it is raining kittens 🙂 Det regner kattunger! Maybe it is from norse mythology, like you said 🙂

  2. That was really interesting as your blogs always are since you put your heart and soul into all of them. Have a wonderful day no matter what comes from the sky. I guess as long as we’re looking up, it’s all good!

  3. Haha! I’m staying the heck out of Bosnia…unless their umbrellas are made of steel! Yikes. This is funny and it does make one wonder doesn’t it? 🙂

  4. Oh, I LOVE this post! This is the kind of trivia that fascinates me–especially as someone who loves language in general and idiom, in particular. Love the shoemaker and crowbar expressions, especially! LOL

    Hugs from Ecuador,
    Kathy

  5. Hahahahahah Bosnia is my neighbour country and I’m ashamed to tell that I haven’t heard that expression.. Which is even weirder sonce I have tons of relatives there… In Croatia we say “Lije ko iz kabla” which means “It is pouring like from a cable” XD

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